See Beyond Darkness by Canon

Expanding viewers’ horizons through technology, Canon has pushed its creative boundaries with a new “Canon See Impossible” video that celebrate Canon’s commitment to making the seemingly impossible possible. This new video – “See Beyond Darkness”– showcases the capabilities of Canon imaging technology which enables researchers, professional photographers, cinematographers and enthusiasts to shoot impactful clear, crisp imagery, even when masked in darkness due to extremely low-light conditions.

In “See Beyond Darkness,” the impossible assignment for Director of Photography Andy Casagrande was to record images of a rare biofluorescent turtle found only in the remote, unspoiled reefs of the Solomon Islands. The low-light capabilities of Canon’s ME20F-SH Multipurpose Camera and EOS-1D X DSLR camera enabled researchers to capture vivid images without disturbing the natural environment.

The Making of See Beyond Darkness

This “Behind the Scenes” video chronicles the expedition and the adventure of recording what had previously been beyond perception. Hear how “See Beyond Darkness” Director Klaus Obermeyer and Cinematographer Andy Casagrande utilized Canon technology and what the incredible images mean to researchers and cinematographers alike.

Canon 120MXS 120MP CMOS Sensor

The 120MXS is an ultra-high resolution CMOS sensor with 13280 x 9184 effective pixels(approx. 60x the resolution of Full HD). It has a size equivalent to APS-H (29.22mm x 20.20mm), and a square pixel arrangement of 2.2µm x 2.2µm with 122 million effective pixels. Ultra-high-resolution is made possible by parallel signal processing, which reads signals at high speed from multiple pixels. All pixel progressive reading of 9.4fps is made possible by 28 digital signal output channels. It is available in RGB or with twice the sensitivity, in monochrome.

Understanding Portrait Lenses: Part-2

In the second installment of this 2-part tutorial, Mark Wallace demonstrates the differences between wide angle and telephoto lenses for portrait photography. This video debunks the myth that wide angle lenses distort faces, shows why you should use longer zoom lenses in the studio, even a small studio. Mark also walks through the process of using a 35mm lens for environmental portraits.

First Look: The Canon EOS 6D Mark II

Canon EOS 6D Mark II—the camera for adventure photographers seeking the highest quality, full frame images to bring their story to life.  A compact and lightweight DSLR camera, whether you are embarking on weekend adventures or the trip of a lifetime.  Whatever the lighting situation, it is the perfect camera to take with you to ensure all your images stand out.

Announcing: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

The 5D Mark IV is the successor to the wildly popular 5D Mark III, and features DCI 4K video at 4096 x 2160 at both 24 and 30 fps. The camera has a 30.4 Full-Frame CMOS Sensor with shooting speeds up to 7 fps. Built in WiFi, NFC and GPS top-off some of it’s new features.

Canon also announces 2 new lenses. The Canon 24-105mm f/4L II and the 16-35mm f2.8L III lens.